Meet Crocs Xanadu & Fast Eddie

Fast Eddie and Xanadu are two problematic American crocodiles rescued by ACES Team in July 2010. Once again, they are problematic crocodiles because they have been fed illegally for years by locals as a 'tourist attraction.' Just like feeding a bear, a fed croc is a dead croc. Being they are apex predators, that do have a developed cerebral cortex, they remember humans have fed them and begin to seek out humans for food.

At over 11 feet, this makes these giant reptiles like Fast Eddie here, very dangerous and prone to attack. In the USA, any alligator that has been fed is shot on the spot. American crocodiles however, are threatened of becoming endangered. ACES instead captures Belize's problematic crocodiles and relocates them to a crocodile sanctuary where they can live out there lives in peace and visitors can come learn all about them.

 In addition to making a normally shy animal more aggressive,feeding these modern day dinosaurs causes them to become ill. Just like us, they can contract diabetes and even gout from a poor diet. The local, untrained, "croc feeders," were feeding these crocs a sole diet of semi-thawed store bought chickens which have practically no nutritional value to crocodile that primarily feeds on fish, crab, shrimp, shore birds and an occasional raccoon.

Just like a child raised on nothing but candy, these fed crocs become ill. Fast Eddie, as seen here, hardly has any teeth. This is not normal in a large, adult, wild crocodile and most likely due to poor diet. Normally a crocodile's teeth will continue to grow throughout their entire lives; and they can  even regrow teeth that are lost.

Full Story of their relocation to ACES Click Here.

Fast Eddie came up missing after the arson of ACES (CNN Link). He is believe to have escape unharmed when villagers opened his habitat during the riot.

Xanadu Needs Your Help! Thanks to help from people like you, Xanadu has been relocated along with Croc George to ACES Educational Crocodile Eco-Sanctuary in Ladyville.  Sponsoring her will provide food, vitamins, and medical supplies for her continued care at ACES. She's there for you to come visit anytime!